Patch Holes – Drywall

Patch Holes – Drywall

 

You can view all of my Posts by clicking on the following LinkHelpMeFixHome.com

 

Patch Holes – Drywall is a post that will instruct you on repairing all types of holes in Drywall, big or small. There are different products and different techniques for different types of holes. Small holes will be repaired using a 1” Putty Knife and a patching product like: DAP Patch n Paint Lightweight Spackling (or comparable product) (for holes less than ¼” in diameter).

Larger holes should be repaired using a Screen Patch, 4”, 6”, and 10” Putty Knives, and a product like: Sheetrock Lightweight All Purpose Joint Compound Spackling (or comparable product) (for holes between ¼” to 5” in diameter). Screen Patches come in a variety of sizes, with the 6” size, usually being the largest that you will use. Holes that are larger than that, will repair better by removing a section of Drywall and replacing that section with new Drywall. Then, tape and mud the joints. However, there are also larger Screen Patches specifically designed to go around Sprinkler Heads and Can Lighting, when the Wallboard surrounding those types of holes have been compromised.

 

Depending on the holes’ sizes and types, use the appropriate Materials and Supplies from the following list:

Materials & Supplies Needed:

For small holes:

    • DAP Patch n Paint Lightweight Spackling (or comparable product) (for holes less than ¼” in diameter)

 

For larger holes:

    • Screen Patch (size dependent on hole size and type)
    • Sheetrock Lightweight All Purpose Joint Compound (or comparable product) (for holes between ¼” to 5” in diameter)
    • Wallboard (if large sections need replacement)
    • Greenboard (if replacing Wallboard in Bathrooms)
    • 1# box of 2” Wallboard Screws
    • Self-Adhesive Mesh Drywall Joint Tape (you can also use the Paper Tape, but it is harder to work with)

 

In order to purchase any Materials & Supplies Needed, see the appropriate page in any of the drop-down pages under:  Home Products – Supplies  in my Top Menu.

Scroll down the list to find the correct item. You will find an explanation of that item, as well as, links under each item, which direct you to my Recommended Suppliers for you to check out their offerings.

 

Tools & Supplies Needed:

    • Safety Glasses
    • Mechanics Work Gloves
    • Dust Mask
    • Spray Bottle
    • Pencil
    • 25’ Tape Measure
    • Stud Finder
    • Painter’s Tape
    • Small Ball-Peen Hammer
    • Stanley Knife with Sharp Blades
    • Drywall Saw
    • 12” long Straight Edge
    • 4’ T-Square
    • 4’ Level
    • Tin Snips
    • Cordless Screwdriver with Phillips Head Bit
    • 1” Putty Knife
    • Scrap piece of 2” x 4” (6” long”)
    • Claw Hammer
    • Sandpaper (fine grit)
    • Shop Vac

 

In order to purchase any Tools & Supplies Needed, see the appropriate page in any of the drop-down pages under:  Home – Garden: Tools and Equipment List  in my Top Menu.

Scroll down the list to find the correct item. You will find an explanation of that item, as well as, links under each item, which direct you to my Recommended Suppliers for you to check out their offerings.

 

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Step-by-Step Instructions

 

Please review the information included here in the first 5 Steps, and then review my page:  5 Steps for Project Management.  When you have completed those first 5 Steps, you can return here to continue on to Step 6.

 

Step 1 – Assess the Project

 

Assess the sizes and types of Wallboard holes that you will be repairing. You may have a variety, each requiring a different type of repair. If you are removing and replacing large sections of Wallboard, measure to assess the amount of Wallboard needed. Make certain that you know the thickness measurement. Be sure to use Greenboard if you are replacing Wallboard in your Bathroom. It is mold resistant.

 

Step 2 – Create a Materials & Supplies Needed Sheet

 

Based on your Assessment of the Project, order the appropriate Materials & Supplies Needed in order to complete your Project. Also, include any Tools & Supplies Needed.

 

Step 3 – Calculate Project Cost

 

(Follow the Instructions on the:  5 Steps for Project Management  page.)

 

Step 4 – Order Your Materials & Tools Needed

 

(Follow the Instructions on the:  5 Steps for Project Management  page.)

 

Step 5 – Inspect Your Delivery

 

After reviewing the information here, additional information to complete these first (5) Steps is found in the page:  5 Steps for Project Management.  Simply click on that link and you will be directed there.

After completing those first (5) Steps, return to these Instructions and continue on to Step 6.

 

Step 6 – Wallboard Removal and Replacement

 

If you are removing and replacing sections of Wallboard, begin by putting on your Safety Glasses, Mechanics Gloves, and Dust Mask, and locating your Studs with your Stud Finder at the outermost edges of your proposed repairs. Mark both edges of the Studs with small pieces of Painter’s Tape. Mark your proposed removal area perimeter with your pencil and 4’ Level, being sure to go down the middle of the outermost Studs. Cut, remove, and replace the Wallboard as needed.

 

    • Begin by putting on your Safety Glasses, Mechanics Gloves, and Dust Mask.
    • Start with any Ceiling Wallboard that is being replaced, then, go on to the Walls. The process is the same for both areas, but you may require an Assistant for Ceiling repairs. If any of your Wallboard contains Mold, you should spray the Mold areas lightly using a Spray Bottle with water, in order to keep the Mold spores from becoming airborne when you are removing the Wallboard.
    • Using your Stud Finder, locate the Studs at the outermost points of your repairs. Mark both sides of the Studs with Painter’s Tape. You can also place a piece of Painter’s Tape to mark any internal Studs.
    • Using your Pencil and 4’ Level, mark the perimeter of any areas that you intend to remove and replace. Be sure to mark down the center of your Studs.
    • Take your Stanley Knife with a new blade installed, and score all of your perimeter marks. Go over the entire perimeter at least twice, pressing down fairly hard when scoring.
    • Continue scoring the marks on both vertical ends of your proposed repair areas, going deeper with each pass, until you go completely through the Wallboard.
    • Then, use your Wallboard Saw to cut along the horizontal lines. You will need to score completely through with your Stanley Knife at any Stud locations.
    • Remove the damaged Wallboard.
    • Measure the areas to be replace, and using your Stanley Knife and 4’ T-Square, mark and score your new Wallboard to the size needed. You should score the lines twice, going a little deeper on the second scoring. If your measurements are less than 48”, you should mark and score the entire width of your new Wallboard.
    • Once completely scored, begin with the width of your scored Wallboard, and bend it on one of the scored line away from the score. You may need to tap the back of the Wallboard with the palm of your hand while pressing it over. Once you have bent it over across the entire line, cut the backside of the line with your Stanley Knife. Do this for all (4) marks on your Wallboard, doing the width first and then the length.
    • Once your new section of Wallboard is free, take your Stanley Knife and pull it backwards along the edges with the side of the blade, in order to shave off any inconsistencies. Repeat the process for all (4) sides until the section fits.
    • Taking your Cordless Screwdriver and 2” Screws, attach the Wallboard to the Studs, recessing each Screw slightly below the surface. Screws should be placed approximately 24” apart. Repeat the process for each piece of Wallboard being replaced.
    • Use your Shop Vac to clean up any Wallboard dust.

 

Step 7 – Patching Large Holes With a Screen Patch

 

Apply a Screen Patch to large holes using a ½” – 1” solid surface around the hole.

 

    • When applying a Screen Patch to large holes in your Wallboard, Simply cut the Patch to fit the area using your Tin Snips. Cut the Patch ½” – 1” larger around the entire perimeter of the hole. Then, peel back the protective coating and stick the Patch to the Wall.
    • You should have a ½” – 1” solid surface surrounding the hole. I like to take a scrap piece of 2” x 4” and using the end of the board and my Claw Hammer, indent the solid surface slightly, so that when I apply the Mud, it does not protrude, but rather stays even with the existing Wall.
    • Then, apply Mud according to the same method used in my Post: How to Tape and Mud Drywall

 

Step 8 – Patching Small Holes – Spackling

 

Use DAP Patch n Paint Lightweight Spackling (or comparable product) (for holes less than ¼” in diameter). Remove all unwanted Nails and Screws and spackle holes.

 

    • DAP Patch n Paint Lightweight Spackling (or comparable product), is used to patch holes in your Wallboard that are ¼” in diameter or smaller. Holes that are larger than this should not be patched with this product.
    • Remove all Nails and Screws that are no longer needed. Mark each hole with a small piece of Painter’s Tape as you remove the fastener, so that you do not miss any when you are spackling. Place the Tape piece a couple of inches from the hole.
    • Using your 1” Putty Knife and DAP Patch n Paint Lightweight Spackling (or comparable product), apply some Spackle to each of the holes. Place a small amount of the Spackle near the edge of your Putty Knife, apply it to the hole at about a 30 degree angle, and scrape off any excess surrounding the hole. If you do this cleanly, you will not need to sand these spots. You can merely apply Primer to the areas before painting.
    • If for any reason, you have applied too much and do need to sand, you can not wet sand this product. You will need to dry sand it with medium-grit or fine-grit Sandpaper. You do not need to use a Sanding Block, but merely rip off a thumb sized piece of the Sandpaper, and apply pressure while sanding with a finger or your thumb.

 

Once you have made all of your repairs to your Wallboard, apply Primer to all Spackle spots before you paint.

For large repairs that require taping and mudding, see my PostHow to Tape and Mud Drywall  Once you have finished applying Tape and Mud to your Wallboard and have sanded the final coat, apply Primer to all repairs, and Primer & Sealer to any new Wallboard installed before you paint.

 

Please leave a Comment or ask a Question in the Comments section below.

 

Thank you,

CJ Dodaro

 

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